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This Bite-Size Recipe Proves There’s S’more Reasons to Love Your Muffin Tin

When the s’mores cravings hit, you don’t need a campfire or a broiler to satisfy them. Turns out, all you need is a muffin tin. This fast and easy recipe for s’mores cups from the new cookbook One Pan and Done by Molly Gilbert proves s’mores look even better as adorable, individual cups. In case you’re unaware, Molly has completely revolutionized one-pan cooking. Her first cookbook, Sheet Pan Suppers, provides endless inspiration for weeknight dinners like spinach-stuffed sweet potatoes, and her new cookbook proves one-pan cooking goes beyond dinner and can apply to desserts, like this fun take on s’mores.

The s’mores cups have a graham-cracker base filled with gooey marshmallow fluff and bittersweet chocolate chips, and they’re topped with a sprinkling of flaky sea salt to round out the sweetness. Not only are they insanely adorable, but they’re also just as easy to make as a traditional s’more – and way less messy. This bite-size dessert is perfect for entertaining a crowd, or simply indulging your own sweet tooth and saving the rest for later.

S’mores Cups

From One Pan and Done by Molly Gilbert

Notes

These little cups will have everyone begging for s’more. (Sorry. Had to.) They start with a graham cracker-infused short dough, which gets layered with marshmallow creme, bittersweet chocolate chips, and a pinch of salt to temper the sweetness. Traditional? Not so much. Playful and delicious? Bad puns and all, you bet.

Ingredients

  1. 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for greasing the tins
  2. 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar
  3. 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  4. 1 large egg
  5. 1 cup all-purpose flour
  6. 1 cup finely processed graham cracker crumbs
  7. 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  8. 3/4 cup marshmallow crème (I like Fluff)
  9. 1/2 cup bittersweet chocolate chips
  10. Flaky sea salt

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F, with a rack in the center position. Grease a 12-cup muffin tin with cooking spray or butter.
  2. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the vanilla and egg.
  3. In a smaller bowl, stir together the flour, graham cracker crumbs, and baking powder. Add the dry ingredients to the butter-sugar mixture and mix gently until just combined.
  4. Measure out 1/2 cup of the dough and set aside for the topping. Press the remainder evenly into the prepared muffin cups, filling each about one-fourth full.
  5. Spoon 1 tablespoon of the marshmallow crème over each cup, then top with a sprinkle of chocolate chips, dividing them evenly among the cups. Crumble the reserved dough over the chocolate chips, and top each cup with a pinch of sea salt.
  6. Transfer to the oven and bake until the marshmallow crème is puffed and the dough is deeply golden brown, about 15 minutes.
  7. Allow the cups to cool slightly before running a paring knife around the edges of each one to pop out of the pan. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Source: Reprinted from One Pan & Done. Copyright © 2017 by Molly Gilbert. Photographs copyright © 2017 by Aran Goyoaga. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.

How to Make the S’mores Dip Everyone on Pinterest Is Talking About

There’s no reason to miss out on s’mores just because you’re not near a campfire. Behold this recipe for s’mores dip. Simply broil marshmallows atop melted chocolate and mallow creme, and scoop the whole gooey thing up with honey graham cracker sticks. Who needs a campfire?

Tyler Florence’s Ingenious Hack Will Change the Way You Serve Appetizers

A post shared by tylerflorence (@tylerflorence) on Feb 14, 2017 at 1:11pm PST

Tyler Florence has a toast recipe that just might become your replacement for avocado toast – he calls it Green Goddess Toast. It’s a new recipe from the Spring edition of Family, Food, and Friends, a four-part cookbook series that Tyler Florence released with Chatbooks. The chef shared a video of the vibrant toast on Instagram, revealing that it’s made with a puree of peas, asparagus, and whole-milk ricotta cheese. The puree is a creative take on green goddess dip, which is often made with green herbs and yogurt or mayonnaise. Before spreading the green puree on the toast, Tyler slices a large baguette open and rubs each half with a garlic clove. Once sliced, he spoons the creamy mixture on the bread and finishes the toast with grated ricotta salata cheese, plenty of fresh chives, and miner’s lettuce.

We love the idea of saving time by keeping the entire baguette intact instead of cutting it up into individual pieces before making the toast. This method is much faster, looks prettier, and allows guests to cut the piece of their desired size. Once again, Tyler Florence proves he’s the master of cooking hacks. Who else could convince us that peas could be this sexy?

What’s the Difference Between Dole Whip at Disneyland and Disney World?

Just as the same attractions (Haunted Mansion and Space Mountain) are slightly different at Disneyland and Disney World, the same holds true for the cult fan favorite Dole Whip. Having recently tried both, I can attest to the subtle distinctions, both positive and negative. Pictured above is Dole Whip from Disneyland and below is from Disney World. Which one is cheaper? Which one tastes better? While I’d like to say they are equal in every way, here’s what you should know about both.

Where to Find It

At Disneyland, Dole Whip is found at one spot only: Tiki Juice Bar in Adventureland. At Disney World, you can get your Dole Whip fix at three locations. First up is Aloha Isle in Adventureland (Magic Kingdom). However, if you’re into a vanilla-pineapple swirl, you can go to Pineapple Lanai at the Polynesian Resort. For an adult twist, you can spike your Dole Whip with rum at Tamu Tamu Refreshments in Animal Kingdom.

The Cost

At Disneyland, the pineapple soft serve costs $4.49 and the Pineapple Float (soft serve plus pineapple juice) goes for $5.49 (these prices don’t include California’s eight percent sales tax). At Disney World, it’s cheaper! The soft serve’s $4.19, and the float is $5.29 (not including a six and a half percent Florida sales tax).

The Presentation

Disneyland has a precise operation when it comes to serving the Dole Whip. The swirls are always Instagram-perfect, the Dole Whip comes in transparent thick plastic cups, and the float includes a festive paper umbrella and cherry. At Disney World, our cups were filled a little haphazardly. “Where’s the umbrella and cherry?” I asked. “Sorry, we don’t offer that here,” was the cast member’s disappointing reply.

The cups are different too. The float cup at Disney World is arguably prettier than Disneyland and holds way more juice and soft serve. Disney World also loaded me up on way more soft serve than Disneyland. However, the flimsy paper cup for the soft serve isn’t durable enough to withstand the weight of swirl. It melted and overflowed over the cup, and we eventually had to toss it before finishing. (I know!)

The Flavor

OK, Disney World seems to be winning as there are more places to buy Dole Whip, it’s cheaper, and they are more generous with the portions. Our video producer thought the two Dole Whips taste identical. I thought the Dole Whip at Disneyland is much better, but perhaps I’m letting context get in the way. After all, we tried Disneyland’s Dole Whip in the heat of the Summer and ate Disney World’s Dole Whip in the middle of the Winter (we’re talking 40 degrees outside!). I found the pineapple flavor to fall flat at Disney World, whereas at Disneyland, it’s a bright, acidic punch to your taste buds. However, my taste buds could have been partially frozen from the chilly weather. Or perhaps the machines used to dispense the Dole Whip are different, affecting the flavor and mouthfeel of each. I can’t say for sure!

Conclusions

We’ll all have our individual opinions about which park does Dole Whip better. I personally am team Disneyland, but others may feel differently. If you’ve tried Dole Whip from both Disney World and Disneyland, weigh in on your favorite!

The 5 Things You Must Agree to Before Becoming Oreo’s Chocolate Taster

Mondelez International – the parent company of Oreo, Cadbury, and Milka – is hiring for the dream job of a Chocolate and Cocoa Beverage Taster near London. The part-time position calls for “key responsibilities,” including “being able to taste chocolate and cocoa beverage products and give objective and honest feedback.” Um, yes, we can all gladly do that! What are the qualifications for such? According to the job listing, applicants must have the following:

  1. “A passion for confectionary and taste buds for detection”
  2. “Honesty when it comes to giving an opinion”
  3. “Eager to try new inventive products”
  4. “A communicative personality to build great relationships with your panel”
  5. “A firm grasp of the English Language”

So basically, an applicant must be willing to eats lots of chocolate and clearly communicate whether it’s tasty or not? That all sounds very reasonable!

The 1 Genius Recipe That Combines Your Love of Poke and Nachos

Tuna poke bowls are more popular than ever, and this recipe takes the Hawaiian classic to a whole new level by combining it with nachos. Marinated sushi-grade tuna, homemade guacamole, and crispy tortilla chips prove they’re a match made in heaven in this recipe from The Poke Cookbook: The Freshest Way to Eat Fish by Martha Cheng. The author admits “there’s no cheese in these nachos,” but that’s OK. The creamy guacamole and salty, bite-size pieces of tuna get the job done in this Asian-inspired nachos recipe.

Poke is traditionally served with fried wonton wrappers, but this recipe switches things up by using corn tortilla chips as the base. Whip up this easy appetizer for a dinner party, or take it to a game-day party to give people a new perspective on nachos.

Poke Nachos

From The Poke Cookbook by Martha Cheng

Notes

Okay, so there’s no cheese in these nachos-maybe a better name for this recipe would be “fish and chips,” but then I imagine there’d be even more confusion. What there should be no confusion about: how good poke, guacamole, and chips are together. In Hawai‘i, fried wonton wrappers usually act as the base, but I find that corn tortilla chips work just as well – or even sweet potato, taro, or jalapeño kettle chips, if you like some spice. If you want to jazz it up even further, you can top the nachos with additional condiments such as chopped fresh tomatoes, tobiko, and/or pickled ginger.

Ingredients

  1. For the guacamole:
  2. 2 ripe avocados, diced
  3. 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  4. 1/4 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
  5. 2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion
  6. 1 jalapeño, seeded and minced
  7. 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  1. For the poke:
  2. 1 pound sushi-grade tuna, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  3. 1/2 cup thinly sliced yellow onion
  4. 1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions (green parts only)
  5. 2 tablespoons soy sauce, plus more to taste
  6. 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  7. 1/2 teaspoon sambal oelek (chilli paste)
  1. 4 ounces tortilla chips (about 2 big handfuls)

Directions

  1. For the guacamole: Combine the avocados, lime juice, and salt in a medium bowl. Mash coarsely with a fork, leaving the avocados a little chunky. Add the onion, jalapeño, and cilantro, and fold gently until evenly distributed.
  2. For the poke: In a medium bowl, combine all the ingredients. Fold gently until evenly distributed. Taste, and adjust with more soy sauce as desired. Serve immediately, or cover tightly and refrigerate for up to a day. If you let the poke marinate, taste it again right before serving; you may want to add another splash of soy sauce.
  3. For the nachos: Place the chips in a bowl or on a rimmed plate. Spread the guacamole over them, and then top with 8 ounces of the poke of your choice.

Source: Reprinted from The Poke Cookbook. Copyright © 2017 by Martha Cheng. Photographs copyright © 2017 by Aubrie Pick. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.

Starbucks Can Officially Call Itself an Ice Cream Shop in These Locations

Starbucks has officially added ice cream to its menu in some locations, at least. The Starbucks Reserve Roastery, which is based in Seattle, is expanding its affogato menu to new locations in the US. The menu, which is full of Italian-inspired beverages and floats made with ice cream and espresso, was announced last year but is expanding to 10 upscale Reserve bar locations in LA, Boston, and Washington DC, Business Insider reports. The prices for the affogato items range from $6 to $9, but Starbucks is also rolling out a cheaper affogato menu at 100 regular Starbucks stores in Orange County, CA.

Curious about what’s on the menu? Here’s what’s available. The rest of us will just have to settle for Starbucks affogato-style Frappuccinos, which aren’t made with ice cream but are close enough to satisfy our cravings.

Affogato: “A trio of beverages celebrating the classic Italian dessert. The Classic Affogato is made with two shots of Starbucks Reserve espresso poured over a scoop of ice cream, resulting in the drowning creaminess of the ice cream in rich espresso. The House Affogato adds a touch of demerera syrup and a dusting of cinnamon, while the Shakerato Affogato is made with Reserve espresso shots shaken to an icy froth, poured over ice cream, lightly finished with vanilla syrup and a mint sprig.”

Cold Brew Float: “Starbucks Roastery’s small-lot Cold Brew poured over ice cream. This is also available with Nitro Cold Brew. The Float menu will also include a seasonal specialty, the Vesuvius, which combines Cold Brew shaken with orange peel, orange-piloncillo syrup and ice. Named after Mount Vesuvius in Italy, when the Cold Brew is strained over the ice cream, it’s reminiscent of a subtle volcanic eruption, then finished off with a dusting of mocha powder and an orange twist.”

Cold Brew Malted Shake: “A nostalgic nod to the corner malt shop, Starbucks Roastery’s Cold Brew is spindle-blended with ice cream, malt, and bourbon barrel-aged bitters.”

26 Crazy and Delicious Casserole Recipes That Are Definitely Not Your Grandma’s

While the word ‘casserole’ might make you cringe, remembering mushy tuna noodle casserole your grandma used to make, rest assured there are foodie-approved ones out there – quinoa risotto with truffle oil, pizza lasagna rollups, and chicken florentine artichoke bake, just to name a few. Not many things are more reliable for a fast and easy dinner than casseroles, but you shouldn’t be afraid to branch out and get creative. There’s nothing average about these unique recipes, from the ingredients to the flavor.

25 1-Pot and -Pan Italian Recipes to Solve All Your Dinner Problems

Cooking on a weeknight always sounds like a great idea until the pile of dirty dishes is staring you in the face. The good news is there are tons of one-pot and -pan recipes to save us all from the dreaded dish-duty woes, and in particular, Italian recipes. For those nights when all you want is a comforting pasta, lasagna, or chicken dish – without the hassle of cleanup – turn to one of these 25 recipes.

7 Things You Never Knew Your Grapefruit Spoon Could Do

When most people think of a grapefruit spoon, their very first thought might be, “What’s a grapefruit spoon?” It’s certainly not your average kitchen tool, and you won’t easily find it in the kitchen aisle at most general department stores alongside the can openers and spatulas. (Indeed, I had to venture to a specialty store to purchase mine.) That’s because the grapefruit spoon, as handy and effective as it is in its namesake purpose of scooping out grapefruit flesh, is generally considered a bit of a luxury item that many people might not even think to own. Scooping out a grapefruit with a regular spoon is not an insurmountable task, after all.

However, there’s an even better-kept secret about the grapefruit spoon than the spoon itself: it’s impressively versatile and multipurpose. Think about it: grapefruits are hardly the only foods that need scooping. Plus, the serrated edges of the grapefruit spoon make it quite the formidable scraper, too. If more people knew of all the different tasks the grapefruit spoon could tackle, it might very well become a household item one day (move over, vegetable peeler).

Here are seven hacks to try with the highly underrated grapefruit spoon.